Astronomy Colloquium for 2016-03-09


Series: Astronomy Colloquium
Date: Wednesday 09-Mar-2016
Time: 16:05-17:00 (4:05-5:00 pm)
Location: CSS 2400
Speaker: Dr. Brett Denevi (JHU APL)
Title: Exploring the Innermost Planet: The Geologic History of Mercury

The MESSENGER spacecraft orbited Mercury from 20112015, and provided the first complete view of our solar system's innermost planet. Nearly a year after the completion of the MESSENGER mission, we present a synthesis of our current understanding of the formation of Mercury's crust and its geologic history - a history that has been revealed to be quite different from previous expectations. Mercury's unusual composition appears to have resulted in the formation of an exotic early crust and voluminous volcanic eruptions that affected nearly all of the surface. Subsequent cooling led to global contraction and the end of widespread effusive volcanism, but geologic activity continued in the form of explosive eruptions, tectonic deformation, and surface modification that produced enigmatic "hollows". We explore these features and how Mercury is helping to shape our understanding of the variety of processes and styles of planetary evolution in our solar system.


Colloquia are usually preceded by espresso and ice cream at 1:45 pm in the first floor lobby of the Astronomy Department and followed by an informal reception in room CSS 0254. Anyone interested in having lunch or talking with the speaker, or to being added to the colloquium announcement email list, should contact the colloquium organizer given below. The hour immediately after lunch will normally be reserved for the speaker to talk to graduate students. Students are urged to contact the coordinator to arrange this.

Colloquium Organizer: Prof. Stuart Vogel

SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS:

Special accommodations for individuals with disabilities can be made by calling (301) 405-3001. It would be appreciated if we are notified at least one week in advance.

DIRECTIONS AND PARKING

Directions and information about parking can be found here.

This page was automatically generated on: 03-Feb-2016.